Make a “Delray-licious” Thanksgiving Side Dish!

By Paula Detwiller

Thanksgiving and history seem to go hand-in-hand, don’t they? Even though the story we learned in elementary school about the Pilgrims sitting down to feast with the Indians is now thought to be myth, Thanksgiving will always be a time of looking back at our history, our roots, and how far we’ve come as a nation.

Delray Beach’s early history was dominated not by cranberries or pumpkin pie, but by the sweet, delicious pineapple. In the early 1900s, Delray’s landscape consisted of acres and acres of pineapples, which were exported north on Henry Flagler’s railroad line.

To honor Delray’s history this Thanksgiving, we found this quick and easy recipe from the 1st edition of the GreenMarket cookbook. Recipe contributor Nancy Simons called it “the perfect alternative to a sweet potato dish.”  (And it goes great with ham!)

Pineapple Cheese au Gratin

 2 cans pineapple chunks, drained. Save the juice, all but 6 tablespoons

2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese

1 cup sugar

1 stick butter

6 tablespoons flour

Cornflakes for top

 Melt butter in skillet, stir in flour until blended. Add sugar, pineapple juice and cheese. Cook until cheese is melted and everything is blended together. Add pineapple chunks and transfer to baking dish. Top with Cornflakes and bake in a 350-degree oven for 30 minutes.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING from all of us at the Delray GreenMarket. See you on Saturday!

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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by Sharri Heinzle on February 12, 2013 at 11:23 am

    Side dishes such as salad, potatoes and bread are commonly used with main courses throughout many countries of the western world. New side orders introduced within the past decade, such as rice and couscous, have grown to be quite popular throughout Europe, especially at formal occasions (with couscous appearing more commonly at dinner parties introduced by many Middle Eastern attributes).”

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